Leading Well

Role Engagement Reflection

 The gift of clarity . . . priceless!

The gift of clarity . . . priceless!

ROLE ENGAGEMENT REFLECTION

Contributed by Matt Boda

This is an opportunity to think through four specific areas of engagement related to your role.. On a separate sheet, take some significant time to pause, ponder and record your answers in various areas below. And then, let’s meet to talk through what your sense of engagement in your role.

The issue of engagement is a challenge in almost every enterprise these days.  This tool is a way of assessing the sense of engagement on the part of anyone serving on the front line.  We want to insure a good level of "get to's" . . . a reasonable perspective on "have to's" and "need to's" . . . and a valuing and promoting of "want to's."

GET TO’S

What energizes you

•     Think of the tasks, projects and experiences that are part of what you that cause you to say to yourself: WOW! I love that I get to do that!?

•     Related questions to mine for answers:

1.     What ingredients in your role most appeal to you?

2.     What are you doing that you sense brings God, you, and others great joy?

HAVE TO’S

What drains you

•     Think of the tasks, projects and experiences that are part of what you do that cause you to say to yourself: How can I manage this better or even get this off my plate?

•     Related questions to mine for answers:

1.     What ingredients in your role least appeal to you?

2.     What are you doing that brings little joy, drains you of energy, feels like a poor fit or you feel ill-equipped or capable of continuing to do?

NEED TO’S

What you tend to avoid

•     Think of the tasks, projects and experiences that you routinely avoid and consistently put off.

•     Related questions to mine for answers:

1.     What ingredients in your role do you find most difficult to do?

2.     What are you doing that you consistently struggle with and find difficult to complete? 

3.     What areas do you often find yourself referring to when you say “I need to get to that, but I would rather not!”?

WANT TO’S

What you dream about

•     Think of the tasks, projects and experiences that you find yourself dreaming about or making plans as to how you would engage in them.

•     Related questions to mine for answers:

1.     What ingredients do you wish were part of your role at this church or ministry?

2.     What are things you would love to have added to your role?

3.     What are things you’d love to do or develop if you had the time and resources?

ONE-SENTENCE JOB DESCRIPTION

In the space below, please write a draft of a one-sentence job description that you sense captures your role on our team……

Thank you to Matt Boda (Rock Pointe Calgary) for passing this on to ambrose@large.

The Five Questions of Courage

  This summary is based on the work of Klein and Napier

This summary is based on the work of Klein and Napier

CANDOR:  DO WE HAVE THE COURAGE TO SPEAK AND HEAR THE TRUTH?

  • Do we raise thorny or difficult issues?

  • Are disagreements explored openly, without the team getting polarized and locked into adversarial positions?

  • During team meetings, are structures established to equalize the opportunity to receive input so that the natural tendency for the same few people to dominate does not occur?

  • Are defensiveness and skepticism acknowledged and addressed?

  • Does humor play a role in diffusing tension and helping the team not take itself too seriously?

  • Do people of diverse backgrounds feel welcome and respected as equals?

PURPOSE:  DO WE HAVE THE COURAGE TO PURSUE LOFTY AND AUDACIOUS GOALS?

  • Are charts, graphs, or performance metrics posted and visible?

  • Can people articulate their personal contribution to the core of what drives the business?

  • Is there a link between strategic, big picture goals and day-to-day performance?

  • Do teammates have an understanding of business conditions and of the wider business environment?

  • Are people willing to do the jobs that make the greatest contribution to lofty and audacious goals, even if those aren’t the jobs that are most comfortable, interesting, or enjoyable?

  • Do team goals and individual goals stretch people, challenge them, and evoke a high level of achievement motivation?

WILL:  DO WE HAVE THE COURAGE TO INSPIRE OPTIMISM, SPIRIT, AND PROMISE?

  • Do team members reflect a sense of eagerness and enthusiasm about their roles and the challenges that face them?

  • Does the team have a can-do attitude toward its work?

  • Are unexpected setbacks taken in stride based on an overall optimism about the future?

  • Is the team in a constant search for creative solutions and approaches to the problems with which they are faced?

  • Do individual team members have a general sense of optimism toward who the team is as a team and how well individuals work together?

  • Do teammates take pride in their work?

RIGOR:  DO WE HAVE THE COURAGE TO INVENT DISCIPLINES AND STICK TO THEM

  • Is there a built in expectation among team members that they will help each other learn the best practices essential to perform at the highest levels?

  • Has the team established procedures for planning, including gathering relevant data to make informed and prudent decisions?

  • Are equipment and supplies well maintained and kept in order?

  • Are rules and guidelines used to ensure the maintenance of the highest possible standards?

  • Do members of the team follow through and actually do what they say?

  • Does the team pay attention to the consequences of problem solving and decision making both within the team and in relation to other parts of the organization?

RISK:  DO WE HAVE THE COURAGE TO EMPOWER, TRUST, AND INVEST IN RELATIONSHIPS

  • Do all team members talk about team efforts with reference to “we,” or do a few individuals talk in terms of “me” or “us and them”?

  • Do team members celebrate the success of other teammates, sharing in each others’ achievements vicariously?

  • Is work delegated to the best person, with no hoarding of work as a means of control and personal entitlement?

  • Is there an atmosphere of benefit of the doubt, trust, and acceptance?

  • Do individual team members show the ability to shift their priorities based on changing urgencies and the needs of others?

  • Is time invested in building the kinds of relationships that foster trust and dedication?